Paper + pencil

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I’ve noticed that Hannah’s drawings change depending on the paper she uses. For instance, anything with texture makes her drawings a little soft. She gets a more confident line and I see stronger blacks in work done on regular printer paper. It must also have something to do with the pencil that’s nearby when she feels the urge to draw. I’ve given up on buying drawing pencils. Those always go missing and in any case she has to like how it feels in her hand and works on paper or it doesn’t happen.

But, boy, when everything comes together like it did above …

The fiddle leaf fig

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Astonishing plant that seems to thrive on benign neglect. I found it a couple of weeks ago in Morro Bay and only just watered it this past weekend. It’s sitting under a window and I’m afraid that the light will not be enough to compensate for the draft from that uninsulated wall and old window. I’ve read that it dislikes being moved to a larger pot until it’s about ready to walk out of the current one, which works for me. I’ve left it alone except for cleaning its leaves, and my reward this week? A new leaf.

No, thank YOU.

“Thank you for letting us consider “Once Upon A Eucalyptus Dragon“. The first section was engaging but ultimately fell outside of our interests, which are predominantly Beginning Readers and Picture Books. That being said, our readers found these first pages very interesting and believe that you will have luck placing this elsewhere.”

For the most part, I’ve come to terms with the fact that it is difficult for me to flog my writing—or any part of myself, really—on social media, ultimately a bad thing for anyone aspiring to sell books. I’m so in love with sentences that I tend not to look up too much, and I am grateful for a supportive group of like-minded friends, but it does get lonely.

A letter like this publisher’s is very good for the soul. (And I still like this best of all.)

Happiness is colored bright orange


 
Collaboration with Hannah on the first of six pieces: Her drawings will be made into ceramic decals and fired onto each piece. Now let’s see if I can do my part and glaze these so it all works, and hopefully I didn’t overpaint that lovely underglaze. So far, so good, everything survived the first firing.

Anything with clay is an exercise in patience. This below is what happens when you rush:

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Ceramic decals

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Waiting on a kiln to cool down is THE hardest thing, and I don’t know how potters do it. We have six bisque plates in ours, decorated with something I’ve never tried before: ceramic decals, made from a few of Hannah’s drawings. I’m on edge since we’re leaving for Canada on Friday which meant these had to be fired today (the decals finally arrived yesterday). And I am worried that I may not have let the plates dry long enough. We’ll see. In like a zillion hours.